Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Google Maps

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Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Free and always accurate driving directions, Google Maps, traffic information for Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (VC). Explore satellite imagery of Kingstown, the capital city of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, on the Google Maps of Central America and the Caribbean below.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (GPS: 13 15 N, 61 12 W) are located in the Caribbean, islands between the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean, north of Trinidad and Tobago. The country’s area measurements are total: 389 sq km; land: 389 sq km, water: 0 sq km. This sovereign state is twice the size of Washington, DC. The total irrigated land is ten sq km (2012).

One of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines’ crucial features: The administration of the Grenadines group’s islands is divided between Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Grenada. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is comprised of 32 islands and cays.

It’s significant, and at the same time, the principal city, Kingstown’s GPS coordinates are 13 08 N 61 13 W. Kingstown’s local time is 1 hour ahead of Washington DC during Standard Time. The capital’s time difference: UTC-4.

For more information on Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, please scroll down below the Google Maps.

Google Maps Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Kingstown, Central America and the Caribbean




About Saint Vincent and the Grenadines in detail

Flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Map of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
The flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Map of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Resistance by native Caribs prevented colonization on Saint Vincent until 1719. Disputed between France and the UK for most of the 18th century, the island was ceded to the latter in 1783. The British prized Saint Vincent due to its fertile soil, which allowed for thriving slave-run plantations of sugar, coffee, indigo, tobacco, cotton, and cocoa. In 1834, the British abolished slavery. Immigration of indentured servants eased the ensuing labor shortage, as did subsequent Portuguese immigrants from Madeira and East Indian laborers.

Conditions remained harsh for both former slaves and immigrant agricultural workers; however, in a depressed world, sugar prices kept the economy stagnant until the early 1900s. The economy then went into a decline period, with many landowners abandoning their estates and leaving the land to be cultivated by liberated slaves. Between 1960 and 1962, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines was a separate administrative unit of the Federation of the West Indies. Autonomy was granted in 1969, and independence in 1979.



Saint Vincent and the Grenadines’s conventional long form: none, traditional short form: Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, etymology: explorer Christopher COLUMBUS named Saint Vincent after Saint VINCENT of Saragossa because the 22 January 1498 day of discovery was the saint’s feast day. Explorer Christopher COLUMBUS named Saint Vincent after Saint VINCENT of Saragossa because the 22 January 1498 day of discovery was the saint’s feast day.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines’s terrain is typically volcanic, mountainous. The country’s mean elevation: N/A, elevation extremes; lowest point: the Caribbean Sea 0 m, highest point: La Soufriere 1,234 m.

The country’s general climate is tropical: little seasonal temperature variation: rainy season (May to November).

The total number of border countries is 0; none are the neighboring nations with the indicated border lengths. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines’s coastline is 84 km, while its marital claims are: territorial sea: 12 nautical miles, contiguous zone: 24 nautical miles, exclusive economic zone: 200 nautical miles, continental shelf: 200 nautical miles. Waterways: N/A. Land use: agricultural land: 25.6%; arable land 12.8%; permanent crops 7.7%; permanent pasture 5.1%; forest: 68.7%; other: 5.7% (2011 estimate).

The population in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 101,844 (July 2018 estimate), urban population: 50.6% of total population (2015), central metropolitan area’s population: KINGSTOWN (capital) 27,000 (2014), while Saint Vincent and the Grenadines has most of the community is concentrated in and around Kingstown. Their spoken languages are English, French patois. Main religions in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines are Protestant 75% (Anglican 47%, Methodist 28%), Roman Catholic 13%, other (includes Hindu, Seventh-Day Adventist, other Protestant) 12%. The nation uses English common law. It is a(n) parliamentary democracy (House of Assembly) under a constitutional monarchy; a Commonwealth realm, National holiday(s) Independence Day, 27 October (1979).

Economic overview for the country: The success of the economy hinges upon seasonal variations in agriculture, tourism, and construction activity, as well as remittances. Much of the workforce is employed in banana production and tourism. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines are home to a small offshore banking sector and fully adopt international regulatory standards. This lower-middle-income country remains vulnerable to natural and external shocks.

The economy has shown some recovery signs due to increased tourist arrivals, falling oil prices, and renewed growth in the construction sector. The much anticipated international airport opened in early 2017 with hopes for increased airlift and tourism activity. The government’s ability to invest in social programs and respond to external shocks is constrained by its high public debt burden, 67% of GDP at the end of 2013.

Natural resources of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: hydropower, arable land.

Main export partners for Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Central America, and the Caribbean are Trinidad and Tobago 18.9%, St. Lucia 14.8%, Barbados 12.3%, Dominica 9.7%, Grenada 9.3%, Antigua and Barbuda 8.4%, Poland 7.1%, St. Kitts and Nevis 4.1% (2015) for bananas, eddoes and dasheen (taro), arrowroot starch; tennis racquets, while the main import partners for the country are: Trinidad and Tobago 29.3%, US 17.2%, Singapore 8.7%, China 8%, Barbados 6%, Poland 5.5%, Turkey 4.4% (2015) for foodstuffs, machinery and equipment, chemicals and fertilizers, minerals and fuels.

When you visit this country in Central America and the Caribbean, consider the natural hazards in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: Hurricanes, Soufriere volcano on the island of Saint Vincent is a constant threat, while infectious diseases are noted: active local transmission of Zika virus by Aedes species mosquitoes has been identified in this country (as of August 2016); it poses a significant risk (a large number of cases possible) among US citizens if bitten by an infective mosquito; other less common ways to get Zika are through sex, via blood transfusion, or during pregnancy, in which the pregnant woman passes Zika virus to her fetus (2016). Also, note that Saint Vincent and the Grenadines faces the following environmental issues: Pollution of coastal waters and shorelines from discharges by pleasure yachts and other effluents; in some areas, pollution is severe enough to make swimming prohibitive, Poor land-use planning, Deforestation, watershed management, and squatter settlement control.

You may also be interested in the countries next to Saint Vincent and the Grenadines around its 0 km border – No border countries.